When I was first having my portfolio reviewed by SAIC undergraduate admissions, one of the reviewers advised: “You need to know about the work of Barbara DeGenevieve, look her up.” When I gave her a google search, I thought, “What a fucking badass. A wikipedia article and everything.” Once I learned I was admitted to SAIC, I knew I had to take a class with her. And yes, she does email a huge assignment for the first day of class so you know she’s not fucking around. I did my introduction to the class nude because Barbara’s the kind of person to get you to push your limits. When I learned what depression felt like, she spent massive amounts of time talking me through it and I remember her saying, “don’t get too comfortable.” She essentially kicked my ass out of the darkness which I think is exemplary of her badassery but also her incredibly kind heart. A role model, a mentor, a friend, an art star — there aren’t enough nouns but what I’m trying to say here is Barbara DeGenevieve changed my life, and I know I’m not alone in that sentiment because mine is only one of the many lives she’s impacted. Rest in power, revel in paradise.

Categories: barbara degenevieve, art, saic,

selahvibe:

My heart is broken. The mentor who had the largest single influence on me, as an artist who writes and makes photographs, passed away Saturday afternoon. Barbara DeGenevieve’s work often unsettled me, and it is this project that drew me to her as a student. These images are from her 2006 work, The Panhandler Project. I often joked that she is my “mama in black art,” which tickled her so much. I took the joke far enough to ceremoniously anoint her an honorary black woman last fall with Mahogany Mother’s Day Cards and a tutorial on how to make a headwrap. I made a few enemies with that, I’m sure. However, she was a true ally who spoke up for students and faculty of all backgrounds and used her privilege to call other white, cis people on their complacency and prejudice. 

Barbara gave me the only incompletes on my transcript because she wanted to keep working together. This past year she insisted on doing independent studies with me, even as her health declined and I was working full time. She knew the work was not done and could see through when I was just presenting enough to get by but not actually challenging myself. 

Just a few lessons she gave: 

Have no regrets.

Guilt is an utterly useless emotion.

Be sexy and be hot. Take pleasure in your power.

Fuck what people think about you. Whatever they believe about you is on them.

Help your mother with her writing. Dream for her. 

Don’t care about being a reliable source of information. Let your audience come to their own conclusions.

Make your own autobiography. Believe whatever you want to believe.

Don’t just write “about” Michelle Obama and Beyonce. You can access them. Write questions you want to ask them directly about this work, because you can.

I want the world to take the time to get to know Barbara’s work. She worked tirelessly, even in the months before her death, as an educator and an artist, rejecting the idea of victimhood to lead to empowerment. She was in the trenches of the diversity conversation before it was popular, working behind the scenes to make SAIC a more inclusive environment. She challenged many of us who feel powerless to stop ingesting messages of inferiority and the burden of respectability. Barbara was a truly fearless and dedicated woman whose influence will be felt for years to come.

Categories: art, barbara degenevieve, saic,
via selahvibe

I LOVE YOU (2013)
by Arjuna Capulong
Performance for video

Exhibited in SAIC Performance Art Accreditation Showcase 2013

junablog:

My art practice isn’t doing so bad either. Catch the conclusion to my one year project at my first solo show at Defibrillator Gallery on Tues. Nov. 26, 8pm! Details: http://bit.ly/junaDFB #published #emergencyindex #performanceart #chicago #books #art (at Defibrillator Gallery)

FIRST SOLO ART SHOW: I am honored and ecstatic to announce that I will be concluding my One-Year Performance at DfbrL8r Performance Art Gallery on Tuesday, Nov. 26, 8pm-10pm by completing the cycle and shaving my hair head-to-toe… A closing ceremony inspired by Catholic, Hindu, and Buddhist tonsure rituals. This is a live performance! I know this is a weeknight and many of you are working, so guests are welcome to arrive mid-performance. More details about the work are available on the Dfbrl8r website. Here is the address: 1136 N MILWAUKEE AVE CHICAGO IL 60642  For those on Facebook, here is the event page that you can join: https://www.facebook.com/events/1379531638960887/

junablog:

My art practice isn’t doing so bad either. Catch the conclusion to my one year project at my first solo show at Defibrillator Gallery on Tues. Nov. 26, 8pm! Details: http://bit.ly/junaDFB #published #emergencyindex #performanceart #chicago #books #art (at Defibrillator Gallery)

FIRST SOLO ART SHOW: I am honored and ecstatic to announce that I will be concluding my One-Year Performance at DfbrL8r Performance Art Gallery on Tuesday, Nov. 26, 8pm-10pm by completing the cycle and shaving my hair head-to-toe… A closing ceremony inspired by Catholic, Hindu, and Buddhist tonsure rituals. This is a live performance! I know this is a weeknight and many of you are working, so guests are welcome to arrive mid-performance. More details about the work are available on the Dfbrl8r website. Here is the address: 1136 N MILWAUKEE AVE CHICAGO IL 60642 
For those on Facebook, here is the event page that you can join: https://www.facebook.com/events/1379531638960887/

via junablog

When I’m not making art, I’m working with an amazing team of people at Hillflint to create high quality-crafted collegiate sweaters without the pricey markups. 

Yesterday, Hillflint launched a Kickstarter campaign to market and sell our first non-college branded product: a plain, varsity-inspired, and genuinely luxurious crewneck sweater. In our first 24 hours, thanks to our friends spreading the word, we have raised over $10,000 of our $20,000 goal on Day One and been tapped into Staff Picks. Let’s keep the momentum going! Please check it out, share, and reblog!

http://bit.ly/hillflint
menofhabit:

Wanted to give everyone the heads up that my good buddy Woody Hines just launched his Kickstarter for his brand Hillflint’s extra-fine grade Australian Merino sweaters. A really great product from an awesome dude.
Awesome to see that they’ve already raised over $10,000 in 12 hours. Follow the link to pick one up: http://bit.ly/mk1swtr

Men of Habit posted about our Kickstarter campaign and now it’s featured on #menswear!

menofhabit:

Wanted to give everyone the heads up that my good buddy Woody Hines just launched his Kickstarter for his brand Hillflint’s extra-fine grade Australian Merino sweaters. A really great product from an awesome dude.

Awesome to see that they’ve already raised over $10,000 in 12 hours. Follow the link to pick one up: http://bit.ly/mk1swtr

Men of Habit posted about our Kickstarter campaign and now it’s featured on #menswear!

Tickled (2012)by Arjuna Capulong, performed with Cathy KimPerformance, video installation, soundDuration: 1 hour
Documentation by: Natalia Nicholson
“Tickled” is performed by Arjuna Capulong as “he who will be tickled” and Cathy Kim as “she who will be tickling.” The performance begins with both performers in a small, congested space, called the “Tickle Room,” where Arjuna is laying on a white pedestal, nude except for a sheer, black pantyhose over his head which distorts his countenance. Cathy begins nude, but with black fabric draped over her entire form and with a white, black-tipped feather in hand. Two red-gelled lights are directed toward Arjuna, creating an atmosphere of red in the space. Suspended over his head is a large video camera gesturing, with cables, a live-feed to a second room, the “Cloud Room”. 
In the larger “Cloud Room” is an immersive environment created with a video of Arjuna being tickled, manipulated so that it is projected as blue light and appears through layers of 12 yards of sheer chiffon fabric. Also simultaneously playing loudly in this room will be an atmospheric, distorted soundtrack that samples female laughter. At the center of the room, placed on a layer of the fabric, is a “cloud,” a pillow emphasized by blue-gelled lights directed toward it and creating a blue atmosphere in the room. Audience members are invited to flow freely between the “Tickle Room” and the “Cloud Room.”
The first action entails in Arjuna being tickled by Cathy with her feather. Her sight disabled by the fabric, she uses the feather to guide her deliberate tickling. She scans Arjuna’s entire body for his most responsive areas. Arjuna reacts genuinely, at times idle, laughing, or gasping for air. This action is carried out for 20 minutes. 
The second action involves Cathy draping black fabric over Arjuna’s entire form. She then holds her feather over his body, positioned by his left side, for 10 minutes. Arjuna is still for the entire duration. 
The third action involves Arjuna rising, while positioning the black fabric so that it drapes over his entirety, and taking Cathy’s hand as they begin to move toward the “cloud” in the “Cloud room”. They are slowly crawling, but the black fabric complicates their forms. Once the performers reach the “cloud” after 15 minutes, both performers slowly sink into the pillow for an additional 15 minutes. The final image is of the black fabric spread over the prone bodies of the performers, on the cloud, with the video and sound continuing to play over them. 

The first half of the piece is inspired by the laughter of an ex-lover, and the contrasting scenarios in which she laughed, such as while in states of pain, pleasure, and nervousness. The second half of the piece is inspired by the longing of a physically and emotionally distant ex-lover, and coping mechanisms created. “Tickled” aims to investigate emotional response, especially laughter, in uncomfortable situations created by the installations.
Performed in 012 Performance Space, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Tickled (2012)
by Arjuna Capulong, performed with Cathy Kim
Performance, video installation, sound
Duration: 1 hour

Documentation by: Natalia Nicholson

“Tickled” is performed by Arjuna Capulong as “he who will be tickled” and Cathy Kim as “she who will be tickling.” The performance begins with both performers in a small, congested space, called the “Tickle Room,” where Arjuna is laying on a white pedestal, nude except for a sheer, black pantyhose over his head which distorts his countenance. Cathy begins nude, but with black fabric draped over her entire form and with a white, black-tipped feather in hand. Two red-gelled lights are directed toward Arjuna, creating an atmosphere of red in the space. Suspended over his head is a large video camera gesturing, with cables, a live-feed to a second room, the “Cloud Room”. 

In the larger “Cloud Room” is an immersive environment created with a video of Arjuna being tickled, manipulated so that it is projected as blue light and appears through layers of 12 yards of sheer chiffon fabric. Also simultaneously playing loudly in this room will be an atmospheric, distorted soundtrack that samples female laughter. At the center of the room, placed on a layer of the fabric, is a “cloud,” a pillow emphasized by blue-gelled lights directed toward it and creating a blue atmosphere in the room. Audience members are invited to flow freely between the “Tickle Room” and the “Cloud Room.”

The first action entails in Arjuna being tickled by Cathy with her feather. Her sight disabled by the fabric, she uses the feather to guide her deliberate tickling. She scans Arjuna’s entire body for his most responsive areas. Arjuna reacts genuinely, at times idle, laughing, or gasping for air. This action is carried out for 20 minutes. 

The second action involves Cathy draping black fabric over Arjuna’s entire form. She then holds her feather over his body, positioned by his left side, for 10 minutes. Arjuna is still for the entire duration. 

The third action involves Arjuna rising, while positioning the black fabric so that it drapes over his entirety, and taking Cathy’s hand as they begin to move toward the “cloud” in the “Cloud room”. They are slowly crawling, but the black fabric complicates their forms. Once the performers reach the “cloud” after 15 minutes, both performers slowly sink into the pillow for an additional 15 minutes. The final image is of the black fabric spread over the prone bodies of the performers, on the cloud, with the video and sound continuing to play over them. 

The first half of the piece is inspired by the laughter of an ex-lover, and the contrasting scenarios in which she laughed, such as while in states of pain, pleasure, and nervousness. The second half of the piece is inspired by the longing of a physically and emotionally distant ex-lover, and coping mechanisms created. “Tickled” aims to investigate emotional response, especially laughter, in uncomfortable situations created by the installations.

Performed in 012 Performance Space, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Seven years of bad luck in the name of art (2012)by Arjuna CapulongPerformance
Documentation by: Sandy Mac
Performed in C24 Gallery, New York, NY 

Seven years of bad luck in the name of art (2012)
by Arjuna Capulong
Performance

Documentation by: Sandy Mac

Performed in C24 Gallery, New York, NY 

Just Let Me Love You (2012)by Arjuna Capulong, Cathy Kim, Alana VargPerformanceDuration: 1 hour
Documentation by: Paul Richter
“Once we come home from our mundane lives, we turn off the lights and show another side of ourselves that we would normally never reveal. Welcome to the alternative space of dominance and submission: A space where you can be as controlling or vulnerable as your heart desires. This is a place of trust and love.”- “Interaction” performance program description 
The performance begins with two conservatively dressed female performers stripping down a willing male performer. They then aggressively throw him to the ground. One of them removes their pantyhose and covers the male performer’s head. From this point on, the male performer is at the mercy of the two female performers who take turns committing acts of aggression, humiliation, and even endearment upon him. Wooden spoons, rulers, ice, and cherry filling are among the tools utilized to carry-out the performance. The stage is set in a room lit by red lights where the audience is invited to observe with the comforts of crackers, cheese, drink, and seats.  Inspired by the highs and lows of relationships and especially by the perversity of a particular relationship experienced by one of the artists.
Performed for “Interaction”, 012 Performance Space, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Just Let Me Love You (2012)
by Arjuna Capulong, Cathy Kim, Alana Varg
Performance
Duration: 1 hour

Documentation by: Paul Richter

“Once we come home from our mundane lives, we turn off the lights and show another side of ourselves that we would normally never reveal. Welcome to the alternative space of dominance and submission: A space where you can be as controlling or vulnerable as your heart desires. This is a place of trust and love.”
- “Interaction” performance program description 

The performance begins with two conservatively dressed female performers stripping down a willing male performer. They then aggressively throw him to the ground. One of them removes their pantyhose and covers the male performer’s head. From this point on, the male performer is at the mercy of the two female performers who take turns committing acts of aggression, humiliation, and even endearment upon him. Wooden spoons, rulers, ice, and cherry filling are among the tools utilized to carry-out the performance. The stage is set in a room lit by red lights where the audience is invited to observe with the comforts of crackers, cheese, drink, and seats.  Inspired by the highs and lows of relationships and especially by the perversity of a particular relationship experienced by one of the artists.

Performed for “Interaction”, 012 Performance Space, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Body (2012)by Arjuna CapulongPhotography installation, 32 inkjet prints8ft x 11ft
I asked several people if I could photograph what they perceived to be blemishes and flaws on and of their own body. The photographs are arranged in order of beauty.
Exhibited in “Artbash 2012”, Columbus Drive Building, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL 

Body (2012)
by Arjuna Capulong
Photography installation, 32 inkjet prints
8ft x 11ft

I asked several people if I could photograph what they perceived to be blemishes and flaws on and of their own body. The photographs are arranged in order of beauty.

Exhibited in “Artbash 2012”, Columbus Drive Building, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL 

Blockhead (2012)by Arjuna CapulongPerformance, sculpture, wood, acrylic latex paintDuration: 2 hours 
Performed by: Arjuna Capulong and Cathy KimDocumentation by: Sam Shapiro 
Blockhead and a female companion guiding him explore the city of Chicago. They seem to take on the role of a peculiar looking couple, holding hands throughout the city. However, Blockhead’s companion becomes frustrated with him at times and he is left to fend for himself.
Blockhead is constructed with four faces on four sides of his head, with each side expressing a different emoticon. Blockhead begins the trip with the “-___-” emoticon facing ahead. The female companion can be seen changing the facing emoticon at times.
Blockhead’s name was given to him from a truck driver passing by who yelled “HEY BLOCKHEAD!” toward the two performers. People passing by choosing to interact with Blockhead received little response or resistance.
Performed through the Loop and Wicker Park neighborhoods in Chicago, IL

Blockhead (2012)
by Arjuna Capulong
Performance, sculpture, wood, acrylic latex paint
Duration: 2 hours 

Performed by: Arjuna Capulong and Cathy Kim
Documentation by: Sam Shapiro 

Blockhead and a female companion guiding him explore the city of Chicago. They seem to take on the role of a peculiar looking couple, holding hands throughout the city. However, Blockhead’s companion becomes frustrated with him at times and he is left to fend for himself.

Blockhead is constructed with four faces on four sides of his head, with each side expressing a different emoticon. Blockhead begins the trip with the “-___-” emoticon facing ahead. The female companion can be seen changing the facing emoticon at times.

Blockhead’s name was given to him from a truck driver passing by who yelled “HEY BLOCKHEAD!” toward the two performers. People passing by choosing to interact with Blockhead received little response or resistance.

Performed through the Loop and Wicker Park neighborhoods in Chicago, IL

Words with Friends (2012)by Arjuna Capulong and Kaitlyn Helene SassPerformance
Documentation by: Runa
Audience members were invited to join the performers for a communal meal. The performance is staged with a dinner table complete with plates and The Blue Danube, composed by Johann Strauss II, is playing in the background. To begin, performers distributed a series of quotations from various sources surrounding topics significant to the performers, such as “love” and “dreams,” however, contextual words were missing and audience members were asked to fill them in with their own words as they see fit. The meal then proceeded, beginning with the performers eating the paper with the audience’s newly written words. The performers engaged in conversation with the audience while chewing the paper. The performance ends with a distribution of cookies for each audience member who volunteered to join the table.
Performed in 012 Performance Space, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Words with Friends (2012)
by Arjuna Capulong and Kaitlyn Helene Sass
Performance

Documentation by: Runa

Audience members were invited to join the performers for a communal meal. The performance is staged with a dinner table complete with plates and The Blue Danube, composed by Johann Strauss II, is playing in the background. To begin, performers distributed a series of quotations from various sources surrounding topics significant to the performers, such as “love” and “dreams,” however, contextual words were missing and audience members were asked to fill them in with their own words as they see fit. The meal then proceeded, beginning with the performers eating the paper with the audience’s newly written words. The performers engaged in conversation with the audience while chewing the paper. The performance ends with a distribution of cookies for each audience member who volunteered to join the table.

Performed in 012 Performance Space, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL